Often asked: What Percentage Of Thai Speaks Laos?

How many people speak Thai Laos?

Can Laos Speak Thai? – Thai Vs Lao Language: From a study by Chiang Mai University in Thailand, it was estimated that over 60% of the people of Laos, understand at least 60% of the Thai Language.

Can Thai speakers understand Lao?

Thai and Lao are closely related languages. They’re in a way mutually intelligible at least for a greater part. Thai people can understand most of spoken Lao, though perhaps with difficulties. If the Thais are from the Northeastern region (Isan), then it’s easier for them, as the Isan dialect is very close to Lao.

Do Thai and Lao get along?

Laos and Thailand have had bilateral relations since the time of their precursor Lan Xang and Ayutthaya kingdoms in the 15th century. The two countries share a border and express linguistic and cultural similarities. Thailand’s northeastern region, Isan, has particularly strong Lao roots.

Is Thai a dying language?

Despite the fact that an estimated six million people speak the language it is under threat of extinction due to the fact that younger generations are not being taught the vernacular. Thailand’s hill tribe communities (minority groups) speak an array of different languages many of which are endangered including Akha.

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Is Lao easier than Thai?

Thai and Lao are closely related languages. They’re in a way mutually intelligible at least for a greater part. Thai people can understand most of spoken Lao, though perhaps with difficulties. If the Thais are from the Northeastern region (Isan), then it’s easier for them, as the Isan dialect is very close to Lao.

Why does Thai sound like Cantonese?

Thai has a richer vowel sounds than any Chinese languages. Thai initial consonants are the same as southern Chinese languages except for the ‘R’. The voiced b and d initial consonants in Thai exist in some Chinese languages (Wu, Min) but not Cantonese.

What is the difference between Thai and Laos papaya salad?

Thai papaya salad, referred to as som tom, uses mainly fish sauce as the flavoring condiment and is generally topped with crushed roasted peanut. Laos papaya salad, referred to as tham mak hoong, uses fermented crab dip (nam pu) and padaek as flavoring condiments.

Is Thai easier than Chinese?

Yes, Thai is considerably easier to learn than any of the other three. I believe the three hardest are Japanese, Chinese and Korean in that order. Thai is a tonal language but although that is a foreign concept it isn’t actually terribly difficult to learn.

What’s the hardest language to learn?

Generally, if you’re an English speaker with no exposure to other languages, here are some of the most challenging and difficult languages to learn:

  • Mandarin Chinese.
  • Arabic.
  • Vietnamese.
  • Finnish.
  • Japanese.
  • Korean.

What are Thai people called?

People from Thailand are called Thais (plural) and an individual is called Thai.

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Why is Laos and Thai so similar?

The two languages, Lao and Thai depict many similarities mainly because both belong to the Tai-Kadai language family. Thailand and Laos share border, and because of international trade between the two nations, there has been a lot of language exchange since ages.

Why is Laos not a part of Thailand?

Modern-day Laos has its roots in the ancient Lao kingdom of Lan Xang, established in the 14th century under King FA NGUM. After centuries of gradual decline, Laos came under the domination of Siam (Thailand) from the late 18th century until the late 19th century, when it became part of French Indochina.

Is Lao hard to learn?

Lao does not take really long to learn (compared to other languages that might take many years or decades). Both Lao and Thai are from the Tai-kadai language class, so by learning Lao first as the foundation, you’ll be able to understand a variety of Lao regional dialects and Thai quicker.

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